Happy Dumpling Day!

28 05 2009

It is time to eat ‘zhong zi’ (dumpling)!

juskawaime loves eating dumpling!! *slurrppp*

Had 2 from Jo’s mum… She made them herself… yummy….

happy dumpling day

happy dumpling day

Happy Dumpling Day!

Happy Ba Chang Day!!

Happy Dragon Boat Festival!! =D





Contract Work

27 05 2009

The good and bad of contract work
Thinking of taking on a contract-based job? First consider some of the pros and cons:

Pros:

  • Flexibility for those who like the freedom of working on preferred projects and for different companies
  •  Opportunities to explore new firms and sectors and to learn new skills
  •  Freedom to decide your working periods: you can work for six months and take a three-month break

Cons:

  • May not get the same level of compensation or an equal range of benefits as full-time employees
  • Lack of job security as it is the company’s decision whether to renew your contract
  • Possibility of a ‘gap’ between contracts if you can’t find another job immediately after the previous one expires

Sources: Robert Walters, The GMP Group, Mercer

 

 

More seek contract work
Professionals less picky as jobs become scarce amid recession: Poll
By Fiona Chan

AS THE recession continues to erode the job market, it is changing the rules of the employment game. Contract-based work is getting more prevalent as companies look to slash costs and individuals get less picky about their jobs, according to recruitment agencies.

A recent survey by recruitment consultancy Robert Walters found that professionals in Singapore were showing ‘an increased interest in taking on contract work’, with as many as a third of the respondents happy to do so in the dismal economic climate.

Fifty per cent of them would consider contract work if no permanent positions were available, said Robert Walters.

Read the rest of this entry »





Life is not fair!

24 05 2009

I really like this post from Jessica, so I am sharing here in my blog. This also acts as a reminder for me … if I do encounter anything unpleasant in future..

My kids are at the age where they are always saying “it’s not fair” when things don’t go their way. I always respond, “Life isn’t fair.”

Last week I found myself thinking “it’s not fair.” My 76-year-old father was diagnosed with a debilitating, degenerative disease for which there is no cure. It always ends in death, after a few years of suffering.
It just doesn’t seem fair.

He faithfully pastored churches for almost 50 years. During his life he has turned down some very lucrative alternatives in order to live in poverty serving other people. And now, after all those years of sacrifice and service, he gets this diagnosis.

No, it’s not fair.

And when I stopped to think about it, I realized that not much in life is fair. After all, was it “fair” that the perfect Son of God was tortured, beaten, and killed because of things I had done? Was it “fair” that He who had done no wrong suffered so much for those of us who more often than not take for granted His great sacrifice? Is it “fair” that we who have sinned get to go to Heaven based on something that someone else did for us?

I’m really glad life is not fair.

HAPPY EASTER EVERYONE, remember…. give thanks to God, for life is not fair!

Source: JessicaYusdi





For whom do we live?

21 05 2009

When we live our lives, a question often come up.

“Why were we born?”

“What were we born for?”

Maybe those questions  might not need to be answered.

Instead, “For whom do we live?”

A very touching commercial, brought to you by Thai Insurance





7 Myths About Marriage and Retirement

19 05 2009
7 Myths About Marriage and Retirement
by Kimberly Palmer
Wednesday, April 15, 2009

Think married couples have it easy? Or that you should get your pension policy to pay out as much as possible, as soon as possible? Well, think again. Predicting that you’ll die too early–or too late–can leave you and your spouse in a financial crunch. New research upends these 7 common myths about marriage and retirement:

Single people need less money. It’s true that that single people spend less money each year than couples, but at all ages over 65, they spend more of their income than couples do, according to research by Michael Hurd, senior economist at Rand. Then, after age 65, single people’s income goes down by three percent a year until it dwindles to 20 percent of its starting value at age 95. (For those at age 65, the probability of surviving to age 95 is around 11 percent.) Couples, meanwhile, maintain their income until the oldest member reaches age 79, when wealth starts to decline at around 3 percent a year. (On average, couples start out with three times the wealth of single people.) So while single people may need less money, they also tend to be less prepared for retirement and spend down their savings much more quickly. (Hurd’s calculations are based on data from the University of Michigan Health and Retirement Study.)

Married couples have less to worry about. While married couples do tend to enter retirement with greater resources than their single peers, there is a small chance that both members of the couple will survive to old age. According to Hurd, at age 65, the chances that both survive to age 77 is less than half. Once one spouse dies, the surviving spouse tends to spend down their joint wealth much more quickly. By age 95, on average the surviving spouse has just 32 percent of the couple’s initial level of wealth.

The worst case scenario is unlikely to happen. A recent survey by AARP Financial found that many people find themselves financially unprepared when the worst case scenario does strike, which compounds the tragedy. The survey, which focused on adults between ages 40 and 79, found that most (57 percent) had already experienced such a crisis, including long-term job loss, divorce, and death of a spouse or partner. Of those who lost a spouse, 63 percent said it had a significant impact on their finances.

Women are especially likely to be widowed, and to run into money problems once they are. According to the Census Bureau, more than 1 in 4 women over age 55 are widows; the proportion rises to two in three for women who are 75 and older. Divorce is another risk factor: While 12 percent of all women over age 65 live in poverty, the rate for divorced women is 21 percent, according to the Government Accountability Office.

Thinking you’ll die young–or live forever. Deciding how much to save and spend depends partly on how long you plan to live, a prediction many people get wrong. According to Hurd’s research, between ages 65 and 69, people tend to think they’ll die sooner than they actually will, which puts them at risk for over-spending. Then, over age 75, people tend to think they’ll live longer than they will, which means they may be overly frugal. Women tend to underestimate their chances of living longer compared to men. Between ages 65 to 69, women tend to underestimate their chances of survival by 12 percentage points compared to men’s four, Hurd says.

Getting as much money as possible, as early as possible, is best. Many people make the mistake of opting for higher payments from pension or other benefits payments during their lifetimes, which means their surviving spouses are left with less later. Mary McGrath, executive vice president at Cozad Asset Management, a financial planning firm in Champaign, Ill., says even couples with other assets should consider selecting an option that allows benefit payments to the surviving spouse after death, because suddenly losing all income adds unnecessary stress to the grieving process. “It’s too upsetting to the survivor to have all of the income cease when you die,” she says.

High-earners have less to worry about. While people who earn above-average income during their working lives tend to have acquired more resources than those who earn less, they also need more money in retirement in order to maintain their lifestyle. Hurd adds that another challenge for wealthier individuals is that they pay much heftier taxes, a factor many people forget to take into account.

Retirees should maintain their wealth until age 100. You can’t go wrong saving too much, but Hurd says it’s reasonable to look at more realistic survival rates. He defines a household as “adequately prepared” for retirement if it has a five percent or less chance of outliving its resources if it reduced its initial spending by 15 percent. By that definition, 83 percent of couples and 70 percent of single people are prepared.

Annuities are too expensive. Hurd says that more people should consider annuities as a way to ensure they maintain their wealth as they age. Annuities, or contracts with insurance companies that allow consumers to purchase a guaranteed income stream, tend to be under-used because people hesitate to pay a large lump sum now for a payout much later. “In my view, individuals are likely distrustful that the annuity will be there in 25 or 30 years when it is needed,” says Hurd. But, he adds, “even partial annuitization would reduce the burden of managing the level of spending and the portfolio.”

Copyrighted, U.S.News & World Report, L.P. All rights reserved.





Singapore Kindness Movement (SKM)

17 05 2009

http://www.singaporekindness.org.sg





Happy ROM, Fann Wong!

16 05 2009

juskawaime wishes Fann Wong and Christopher Lee – “HAPPY BLESSED WEDDING / ROM!!”

Fann Wong and Christopher Lee at The Wedding Game Movie

Fann Wong and Christopher Lee at The Wedding Game Movie

 Fann Wong has became romantically attached to Christopher Lee in late 2002, but only admitted their relationship openly in mid 2005. So their almost 7 years relationship has finally blossomed, and it is about time as both are not getting young. Both are 38 years old this year, with Fann Wong is abt 6mths older.

They have collaborated eight times in the television productions and have played lovers in six of them.

Extracted from Wikipedia

Correction! They have been dating since Yr 2000, and that make them together for 9 years of courtship.

I wonder what are those productions they did? Looking at Fann Wong’s work and Christopher’s works, it seemed we have:

1996: Brave New World

1998: Return of the Condor Heroes

2000: Looking for Stars

2001: Madam White Snake

2001: The Hotel

2002: Brotherhood

2003: Moon Fairy

2004: Always on My Mind

2005: My Lucky Stars

And of course their first collaboration movie is The Wedding Game in Jan 2009, production by Singapore-based Thai Director Ekachai Uekrongtham, featuring also Alice Lau and Charles Cheng (Hei Ren) as their artist managers. More abt The Wedding Game can be read from this blog entry. I didn’t managed to view this movie in the cinema, but watched it twice from CD yesterday. And of course, I am loving my ever- beautiful idol Fann Wong!! *Yeah*

wedding cake figurines from The Wedding Game
wedding cake figurines from The Wedding Game

The solemnisation ceremony today 16th May 2009 will be held in the presidential suite of the Shangri-la Hotel. They would leave for Malacca soon after they exchange vows. This is so that the newlyweds can return to Christopher’s hometown to pay respect to his ancestors, including his father who died on 10th Feb 2009. And according to the chinese custom, a couple will either have to hold the wedding within 100 days of a close kin’s feath or wait three years. So after the solemnisation, the BIG day will be on 29th Sept 2009 where the traditional Chinese wedding, including tea ceremony and wedding dinner, will be held at Shangri-la Hotel. The dinner in Malacca for Christopher’s Malaysian relatives and friends will be at Renaissance Malacca Hotel on 11th Oct 2009. After than, Fann and Christopher plan to leave for their honeymoon.

Extracted from Source:Diva/TheNewPaper

I am sooo happy for them.. finally they are getting married… and meanwhile, enjoy the theme song of The Wedding Game, sang by Christy and Hagen, and is based on the famous English Wedding song called Ave Maria.